Jewels Collecting Dust

Subtitle

Cut Steel

Victorian Cut Steel Shoe Buckles in original Fitted Case

Description: Victorian Cut Steel Shoe Buckles in original Fitted Case.

Code: DS889

Marks: These Are Simply Marked L&R for left & Right

Size: Measures 2 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches each buckle

Age: Victorian

Weight: Each Buckle weighs 49.6 & 44.6 grams

Condition: Very Good Condition.

Status: For Sale

Price: £125.00

Georgian Cut Steel Misers Purse Bag

Description: Georgian Cut Steel Misers Purse Bag . Very similar examples of these can be seen at Wolverhamption Museum website.

These purses date to late 18th / early 19th century

http://www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/collections/browse_collections/locally_made/steel_jewellery?tab=browse&page=2

http://www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/collections/browse_collections/locally_made/steel_jewellery/000253.html

Miser’s purses became popular in the late 1700s and were used by both sexes to hold money. Men carried them in their pockets, while women draped them over their hand or belt.

The miser’s purse was essentially a long fabric tube, with a slit in its mid-section. This opening could be accessed or closed off by sliding two rings back and forth.

It is thought that the name ‘miser’s purse’ stemmed from the fact that it was difficult to lose – or even remove – coins from the deep pockets.

Wolverhampton and Bilston were centres of this craft. By 1770 there were 127 buckle makers in Wolverhampton, and 68 in Bilston.

Marks: Not Marked 

Size: Measures 11 1/2 inches long

Age: Late 18th / Early 19th Century

Weight: Weighs 148 grams 

Condition: Very Good Condition

Status: For Sale

Code: DC

Price: £295.00

Georgian Cut Steel Dark Green Misers Purse Bag

Description: Georgian Cut Steel Dark Green Misers Purse Bag  - Sticks to a magnet. Examples of very similar cut steel Misers purses can be seen at Wolverhampton Museum.

http://www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/collections/browse_collections/locally_made/steel_jewellery?tab=browse&page=2

http://www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/collections/browse_collections/locally_made/steel_jewellery/000254.html

Miser’s purses became popular in the late 1700s and were used by both sexes to hold money. Men carried them in their pockets, while women draped them over their hand or belt.The miser’s purse was essentially a long fabric tube, with a slit in its mid-section. This opening could be accessed or closed off by sliding two rings back and forth.

It is thought that the name ‘miser’s purse’ stemmed from the fact that it was difficult to lose – or even remove – coins from the deep pockets.

Like many purses of this type, one end is rounded, while the other is square.Each end would hold coins of different values so that the owner could easily withdraw the correct amount by feel. The designs of the tassels would also help the owner tell the two ends apart, even in a poorly lit room or dark carriage.

Wolverhampton and Bilston were centres of this craft. By 1770 there were 127 buckle makers in Wolverhampton, and 68 in Bilston.

Marks: Not Marked 

Size: Measures 13 inches long

Age: Late 18th/ Early 19th Century

Weight: Weighs 76.1 grams 

Condition: Very Good Condition

Status: For Sale

Code: DC

Price: £295.00